Two sides of policing

Monday 12th February 2018 (7.21pm)

I had a bit of a strange feeling driving to the pool this morning. I was stuck in traffic and a police car was right behind me. As I looked in my rear view mirror I noticed two PCs and many thoughts quickly spun through my mind. Response officers or NPT? Where were the going? Enquiries? Calls? What would they face today?

My day seemed easy in comparison. My day was planned with a swim and a bike session. I knew I would have a coffee shop stop at some point and have a walk with Olly. Apart from that, my day involved very little decision making, no pressure and no stress. I would not encounter incidents of violence, death and vulnerability. I would return home and not rerun what I have seen and how I have dealt with incidents in my head. Did I do everything I could for that victim? Did I put all safety measures in place? Did I submit the relevant paperwork? Were my incident updates good enough to avoid scrutiny? How is that person that I conveyed for assessment at the mental health unit? What does the future hold for the child with non accidental bruising? As a supervisor, how are my staff? what is motivation like? Am I missing something? What are my resources like for tomorrow?

I then remembered the team I worked with in Cardiff Central and the picture shown popped into my head. All of a sudden I started laughing to myself. This was taken in July 2012. I had just retuned from my honeymoon and I was happy. I loved my team, I was enjoying my job. At this point I was sill a PC, I was to be promoted to Sergeant at the end of the year. Whilst patrolling the city centre in the police van I spotted Jamie Roberts, the Welsh rugby legend. I have no idea how, but I ended up jumping out of the van and asking him for a picture. My male colleague, who is a massive rugby fan looked mortified but he laughed with his head in his hands. It was just one of those funny moments, just one of the many that we had. As a team we were good, we worked hard, we locked people up and we looked after the vulnerable. We got results. The role of the PC is the best in the job and as I continued on my journey smiling, I knew I was doing so with a sense of sadness.

 

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1 Comment

  1. I think people often forget that there’s two sides to everything. On the one hand, most of us want to save the world and make it a much better place to be, but on the other hand, there’s the paperwork and the worry.

    Thank you for the years of service you have given, Georgie, and thank you for your continued work to get mental health illnesses better understood and accepted.

    PS You are loved. ❀

    Like

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